All abilities trek to the summit of Mount Kosciuszko - Australia's highest peak

All abilities trek to the summit of Mount Kosciuszko - Australia's highest peak
All abilities trek to the summit of Mount Kosciuszko - Australia's highest peak - © Jennifer Johnson 2008

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

(Re)Envisioning Tourism and Visual Impairment



As noted in the introduction to the previous blog on the concept of embodiment, Small & Darcy (2011) provided an understanding that the tourism industry needs to consider the embodiments of vision, mental health, hearing impairments and others in developing quality accessible destination experiences. Their introduction identified the domination of tourism by the visual "gaze” (see Urry, 1990) at the expense of considering other senses including taste, touch, hearing, smell and movement. One embodiment where the focus on the "gaze” in tourism is particularly problematic is people who are blind or vision impaired. Photo 1 shows one of the aspects of embodiment where people use guide dogs to wayfind and guide dogs have been noted to be an extra tourism consideration for the group (Darcy & Taylor, 2009).
Photo 1: Geraldine Lane and guide dog Molly board a Skywest flight (© Skywest 2010)

Richards, Prichard and Morgan (2010) provide a wonderful examination of tourism from a non-sighted perspective. They do so through presenting a "hopeful tourism scholarship paradigm" where they discuss their findings from eight focus groups under the themes of embodied tourism encounters, inhospitable tourism spaces and navigating tourism environments. The reference to this article as well as an extract of the abstract is now presented.

Richards, V., Pritchard, A., & Morgan, N. (2010). (Re)Envisioning tourism and visual impairment. Annals of Tourism Research, 37(4), 1097-1116. doi: DOI: 10.1016/j.annals.2010.04.011

Copyright: 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Tourism scholarship has failed to engage seriously with disability issues. This paper presents a critical analysis of the tourism encounters of individuals with vision problems and the positive impacts these can have on their emotional well-being, as well as the challenges they encounter whilst travelling… (Only 10% presented because of copyright restrictions)

References
Darcy, S., & Taylor, T. (2009). Disability citizenship: An Australian human rights analysis of the cultural industries. Leisure Studies, 28(4), 419-441.
Richards, V., Pritchard, A., & Morgan, N. (2010). (Re)Envisioning tourism and visual impairment. Annals of Tourism Research, 37(4), 1097-1116. doi: DOI: 10.1016/j.annals.2010.04.011
Small, J., & Darcy, S. (2011). Chapter 5 - Understanding Tourist Experience Through Embodiment: The Contribution of Critical Tourism and Disability Studies. In D. Buhalis & S. Darcy (Eds.), Accessible Tourism: Concepts and Issues (pp. 72-96). Bristol, UK: Channel View Publications.
Urry, J. (1990) The Tourist Gaze: Leisure and Travel in Contemporary Societies. London: Sage

1 comment:

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